How to Become a HR Manager in the UK

A human resources manager (or HR manager or short) has a number of responsibilities, which are centred on the recruitment, development and welfare of company personnel. They implement and maintain good policies and practices in regards to training, development and salaries. They oversee the recruitment process, and ensure that employees are managed and resourced correctly and to the organisations’ full potential. HR managers also play a role in developing and maintaining positive working relationships between management staff and employees.A human resource manager has a large number of other responsibilities, although some depend on the sector and size of the company. They will contribute to advertising job vacancies within the organisation in newspapers, magazines and online, and are usually assigned the task of responding to the applicants. They will also help with the interview and selection processes for new staff. They will plan weekly staff rotas, ensuring that all shifts are fully staffed, and deal with any related issues (e.g. a member of staff wanting to alter their working hours for a particular day). There are many other duties, and the sheer number of responsibilities may be off-putting to some. However, every company has a HR department, and as a result each organisation requires a HR manager capable of performing any and all of these tasks. If the manager of human resources is not contributing to his/her full potential, the organisation as a whole will suffer.Qualifications
The qualifications that one must have to become a human resources manager will depend on the nature of the industry, and the size of the company. Nevertheless, there are a number of qualifications that are shared by the majority of those who have succeeded in the position.Human resources managers should have a good set of GCSE and A Level results. They should aim to work towards a qualification that relates to HR management. Two examples are the Certificate in HR Administration and the Certificate in Personnel Practice, both from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. CIPD is certainly an industry standard qualification, and on most job descriptions this is certainly a must have if you are to pursue a career in HR.CIPD Qualifications can and will be paid by employers if you are lucky enough, but if you really want to break into this career path, it has to be self funded. CIPD qualifications range from foundation, intermediate and advanced. Investigations have shown that with these types of qualifications you can earn up to £5,000 per year more than someone without the qualification! Deciding which one depends on your experience.There are other worthwhile qualifications that can assist one as they aim to become a HR manager. They include a BTEC HNC/HND (Higher National Certificate/Higher National Diploma) in human resource management, business management, and perhaps psychology as well. For those graduates who have a degree in a subject unrelated to human resources management will often choose to take a postgraduate qualification in this area. This isn’t considered to be essential, but it can be advantageous for those trying for more competitive human resources roles.What Employers Are Looking For
Even before you become a manager, there are a number of key skills that an employer hopes to see in someone who works within human resources. Those working within HR should possess good computer skills, and be able to remain calm and collected when working under pressure. They should also have excellent written and verbal communication skills, be careful when it comes to attention to detail, and have the ability to multitask. It also helps to be able to build healthy working relationships, both with and between personnel. For those who aspire to become a manager, having a good knowledge of employment law and company policies, in relation to personnel, is vital, as is being able to work both independently and in a team.Once you become a manager, many of the core elements of what an employer wants to see remain, but others take on a greater level of importance. You should always be able to meet deadlines, and managing your time properly is essential, but as a HR manager these skills have to become second nature to succeed.As a manager, many people will come to you for information and/or advice. As a result, you will have more responsibilities within the organisation. You should be a confident leader, and obviously possess strong management skills. You should be aware of how to correctly handle any disciplinary issues, and to diffuse potentially difficult situations, or incidents involving conflict, between members of staff. You should take an approachable and compassionate nature, so that people will warm to you and respect you more, and feel that they can discuss anything business related with you.You may be a manager, but you should still be able to take instruction from senior management on what you should be doing and how. And, in the event that advice is not available, you should be able to use logic and your own initiative. All of these are just some of the key skills employers want to see in someone who aspires to be a human resources manager.How Much Money Will I Make as a HR Manager in the UK?
The starting salary for those working in human resources (usually personal administrators) is generally between £15,000 and £18,000 per annum. Once you make it to the position of a human resources manager, your annual salary will increase, possibly as high as £25,000. Those who possess a wealth of experience as a human resources/personnel manager will inevitably earn even more money on a yearly basis as much as £40-£60,000 with HR Business Partners and HR Directors earning in excess of £100,000 per annum.Pros and Cons of Becoming a HR Manager in the UK
As with every position, there are positives and negatives to being a human resources manager. Some of these are related to the managerial position, whilst others apply to human resources in general. Nevertheless, the list below shows the key pros and cons of being a human resources manager.PROS
• Make a valuable and important contribution to the company
• You will help many employees, as a lot of enquiries will go through you
• The chance to progress further up the company ladder
• Your earnings will increase as you gain further experience as a managerCONS
• Could often be working under pressure
• Occasional problems in any company between a manager and some staff
• A great deal of responsibility, which may be too much for some to handle
• Managers usually have to handle a lot of awkward/difficult situationsHelpful Contact Information
For those interested in becoming a human resources manager, there are a number of contacts to be aware of. They can provide further information, and go into extensive detail, on the different qualifications that are required to succeed as a HR manager.For more information on the Certificate in HR Administration and the Certificate in Personnel Practice, both accredited by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, contact:
Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development
151 The Broadway
London
SW19 1JQ
Telephone 020 8612 6200
Certificate in HR Administration: http://www.cipd.co.uk/training/CHRAFor details on the BTEC HNC/HND qualifications relevant to human resources, contact:
Edexcel
190 High Holborn
London
WC1V 7BH
Telephone 0844 576 0026
BTECs: http://www.edexcel.com/btec

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